There have been multiple accounts created with the sole purpose of posting advertisement posts or replies containing unsolicited advertising.

Accounts which solely post advertisements, or persistently post them may be terminated.

r00ty avatar

r00ty Admin

@[email protected]

I'm the administrator of kbin.life, a general purpose/tech orientated kbin instance.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Nah. Netflix used to be a reasonable price and a very decent alternative to the rip off prices of cable and satellite TV.

Then of course every other media company wanted to charge the same price each time splitting off shows that used to be on Netflix.

It's reached the point that it would cost the same ripoff prices to get all the services needed for most people to watch what they'd like to watch.

This is just too much to pay per household per month for entertainment.

Bring back one service that provides all the TV (not even movies) for less than 30usd/25 gbp and I'm there. But I'm not subscribing to them all. It's ridiculous.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Read the article. It's the UK (which still has most EU employment law active). Now, I don't think it's illegal to do what they're doing. Effectively, I can bet I know exactly how they're framing this, and it'll be totally legal.

The calls were almost certainly initiating the redundancy process. That is, technically EVERYONE (probably below management) is being made redundant. As part of the redundancy process, an employer is expected to attempt to find internal opportunities for the employees to be culled, and this new position is what they are likely offering as said opportunity. I suspect this is working around a bit of a grey area in redundancy law. But, I don't think they're falling foul of any law. But, I'm not a legal expert.

So, at the end of the required redundancy period (it varies based on employment duration) they will either be let go (with whatever statutory redundancy pay they're owed) or re-employed under the new zero hours contract.

Personally, I think this has the potential to blow up in their face a bit. It's not allowed in the UK to employ someone on a zero-hour contract and not allow them to work elsewhere. Such a clause in a contract may be ignored. Now, this could well mean they say "Oh we need you on Wednesday" and you say "Well, actually I've already agreed a shift elsewhere on Wednesday" and there's really not much they can do about it. I also hope the people working there just move on.

The worst thing that can happen is that the parent company benefits from this. It'll just make other retail companies do the same in a race to the bottom.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Well, in the first line they reference an article from yesterday which made it very clear.

I'm not too sure why the response was so defensive. That point made up a miniscule part of my overall comment and wasn't even close to the primary subject matter.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

OK buddy, I'll leave you to your online persona :)

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Yeah. I'm completely behind the complaints people have with a lot of modern world problems in this regard.

  • Ads on TVs you paid for
  • Ads on streaming services you paid for
  • Actually, ads on cable/satellite TV with a subscription in general. What a ridiculous concept of paying twice!
  • Subscriptions for hardware features already installed (although I am fine with a one-off payment to activate them. I can see the argument for a single SKU with all features installed and deactivated for making the production line simpler)

But in this case, they're very clear. They are making hardware available at no monetary cost. Therefore, you MUST know they're monetizing you somehow, and this is the somehow.

Having said that, yes, the description does seem like the dystopian tellyscreens in nineteen-eighty-four. But they were mandatory for everyone, which is the main difference.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Actually looking through the site. I don't really see how they're going to make enough money on this.

I cannot see anywhere on their site that suggests the camera will be watching you (and there's probably laws against that, even in the USA!) and the FAQ specifically says the camera has a cover and only an app using the camera will make that open, and you have to accept the permission.

Also, it seems they play the ads on a separate screen. Which suggests there won't be sound either. So they don't even expect you to be paying attention to the ads, because it seems they won't block content for them.

I expect there might be an initial interest in advertisers. But if they don't see a decent conversion rate, I cannot imagine they will keep paying enough to cover the TV for ads.

Also, what happens when one of these breaks, they replace it for free? I'd imagine they would need to because otherwise the hardware they paid for is no longer generating revenue.

This sounds like a late April fool. :P

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

1/10, would not be a human sacrifice again?

Is xz 5.6.1-3+ still dangerous?

When the xz backdoor was discovered, I quickly uninstalled my Arch based setup with an infected version of the software and switched to a distro that shipped an older version (5.5 or 5.4 or something). I found an article which said that in 5.6.1-3 the backdoor was “fixed” by just not letting the malware part communicating...

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Yeah, I checked myself when this was first a thing. Debian 12 and Ubuntu 22.04 latest are on 5.4 and 5.2 respectively.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Yep. While it has been decades since I had a home SSD failure. But I have had 2 SSD failures in the last 10 years in server hardware. In the first case it was RAID striped and I needed to restore from backup. In the second case it was part of a raid 1 array and I just requested a replacement and got on with my day.

In my house, I have non raid SSDs on my own PC. But important stuff is on my NAS made up of 4xHDD drives in raid 5 (that also has the important folders backed up to an encrypted cloud).

RAID still has a place in an overall data security solution. Especially for servers that you want to keep up.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

It's all good until you get into a dependency loop with your email account passwords needing resetting, that have the email from the other account that needs resetting :P

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I have 2x27" screens. 1 is 1080 the other 1440.

For work, I would say it's invaluable (software developer) to have say VSCode/VS running on local machine and say an RDP session open. Or to have open Jira issues on one screen or basically the actual program code and another screen with information/testing environments. It's far better than finding the window you need all the time with alt-tab/the task bar.

Outside work, I generally have youtube on the 1080 screen while doing other things (games/personal development etc) on the 1440 screen.

As for a third monitor. I think there's definitely valid use cases. But, I have a big desk but another 27" screen would just take up too much space. I am tempted in the future to replace the 1080 with something higher resolution though.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I mean, not saying anyone should, because evading copyright is bad. But technically, you could run say forgejo as an onion service. Connecting git to clone from it would take some extra steps but, if hidden well it'd make it somewhat harder to take down.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Well, I run forgejo for my own stuff. So, let's say I decided to host something that is subject to a copyright complaint. As soon as people start using your repo and their lawyers get a whiff of it, they'll just take the IP of your server and DMCA the owner of the IP. Whether it be me, or the host. It's an entity they can go after and will need to yield to appropriate law. The effect would be the same as the DMCA going to Github.

But on tor, it hides the entity operating and running the server. Making it a lot harder to find the person to even send the DMCA to, let alone start the legal wheels turning, if it were ignored.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Well no. If the programmer uses prepared statements, they are protected. If they use a prepared statement but actually just put their own unsanitized statement in there and execute it, it's not protected.

Now, I'd like to say it is 2024 and everyone should be using AT LEAST prepared statements for security. I've seen people doing some scary things in my time, and that includes quite recently.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

It does seem to be an external site. Likely, the main site running on a CDN or at least outside their actual infrastructure is informed when traffic is high, so they start redirecting to the queue site.

The queue site starts to create a virtual queue of people trying to visit. The main site requests x users at a time depending on load and queue site then redirects to the actual site with some cookie proving you're the valid person.

In this way, the load on their site is minimal.

Having said that, just how much traffic does this road safety site generate to need a queue? Is there something that happens this time of year everyone needs to do?

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I did wonder what all the fuss was about. I don't live in Scotland, I live in the UK though. So it's kinda partially relevant to me. It's also relevant to JK Rowling I guess. But really not sure why Musk or Rogan feel the need to weigh in.

So, the act itself is not that long and is here https://www.legislation.gov.uk/asp/2021/14/introduction. There was also a 70+ page consultation/memorandum document that I also read (here https://www.parliament.scot/-/media/files/legislation/bills/s5-bills/hate-crime-and-public-order-scotland-bill/introduced/policy-memorandum-hate-crime-and-public-order-scotland-bill.pdf).

So, I think generally the law is well-meaning and a good thing. I think there were a few things I took issue with in the consultancy. Those were mainly that they had a review of the law by a lord, and a consultancy with individuals and organisations. However, they seemed to just not take into account some of the recommendations from either source when it didn't suit them.

When the consultancy didn't turn up a result they liked, they would just state that it's likely the people didn't favour hate crime law overall. Now to me that's kinda the point. If most people don't want an extension of hate crime law, and you're asking them about creating an extension of hate crime law, that consideration should have been taken into account.

I also think that Lord Bracadale raised a few good points which were also dismissed. The main one being about not including insulting as a qualifier for the new hate crime law. Here, I'd agree with what the people surveyed said. The term is far too subjective to be used in a law with such a maximum sentence. There's nothing wrong with the spirit of the law, but I believe it should be abundantly clear when the line for breaking the law has been crossed. Saying "that a reasonable person would consider to be threatening, abusive or insulting" isn't a clear objective statement. It makes it very subjective and very interpretable by the police officer(s) involved and the CPS.

Of course, none of the above is why the aforementioned people are complaining. But having read through it, those are just my concerns.

I have the same concerns about the Public Order Act (UK law, 1986) that has similar subjective definitions. However, that doesn't include "insulting" and only has a maximum sentence of 6 months and is almost always dealt with by way of a fine. So, the threshold being low and subjective isn't as concerning. This law seems to have a lower threshold to satisfy (despite the memorandum document stating it was meant to have a higher threshold than the existing laws it replaced and augmented) but a considerably longer maximum sentence (1 year summary, 7 years on indictment), which will almost certainly mean higher values in the sentencing guidelines. This is my main concern with it.

In summary, I think as an act and new law overall, it's fine and I do hope if used appropriately it will make people safer. I just feel like there's scope for over-zealous application due to the subjective language used. Time will tell I guess if that happens or not once cases and convictions start to happen.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Yeah, I did notice the lack of exception for a private dwelling as exists for the Public Order Act. On one hand, I don't think there's a place for some jokes. But on the other hand, if they're happening between people in a private setting, then I don't think it should be the law's business.

In terms of reported incidents. I think recording for anonymous statistics is fine. I'm very wary of naming people that haven't even been charged, for example. It's a slippery slope. But, keeping the number of reported incidents is good for statistics. I am aware of the risk that also entails, though.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Damn, I was hoping for the verge video.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

the tricky part is when you lose population. the correct move would be to demolish this infrastructure and scale back. trouble is, not only would this be wasteful, but it would also leave gaps in cities, since population decline doesn’t happen uniformly from a city edge. where exactly, do you demolish the infrastructure?

Nah, it's simple. You just redraw the city limits. Tell the "winners" they're now part of the countryside and reduce their public transport to one train per hour.

The problem will solve itself :P

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Pretty sure in some of the cities they do. Yeah, I know in most of the country they don't believe in public transport. But crucially, the topic hadn't gone full "USA", at least not yet. So, still applicable.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I've been working from home for over 15 years now. One thing I do not miss is the "social" aspect of the office.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Why do you need all that? I have my work laptop sitting at the back of my desk. Most monitors have two inputs. I've got an older 1080 with HMDI+DVI and a newer 1440p with DP/2xHDMI.

So I have the laptop in HDMI on both screens (it needed a USBC to HDMI cable for one of the outputs), and a simple USB3 switch for the mouse+keyboard.

So when I'm working I fire up the laptop, switch the USB over to that and swap the screens to the HDMI inputs. When I'm done working I can fire up the desktop, swap inputs and USB and in seconds I'm switched over.

I've been doing it this way for years and years now.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

It can help draw a line I'd agree, but I've gotten used to it now I think. I used to have it worse. I operated out of the bedroom for the first few years I was remote and that wasn't good at all. The new house had a bedroom that was really too small to be a bedroom. So it became an office room.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

People that complain about people not running systemd. Why does it bother you so much? :P

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

The thing is, there are legit reasons to want to spoof numbers. My use case is that if I'm not reachable via sip I send the call over the normal phone network and set cid to the calling number.

I guess a middle ground would be that you could spoof numbers to phone numbers you've registered and verified with your provider.

To be honest though, the scammers and spammers will always find a way round it and spoof anyway.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Well to be fair I'd answer just to say "no you're not!"

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Same. Most things are on discord, fully floss projects are often on matrix (and hosted on other source control sites, not github).

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Excuse me, I downloaded my ringtones, and had the funky cables to upload ringtones to my Nokias thank you very much!

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Xennial refers to people born from somewhere in the mid 70s to 1980. It's a narrow subset of Gen X made up of those that were growing up during the information revolution.

I would say it might apply to someone in the very early 80s. But anyone born in 1995 definitely had their formative years with internet access and are firmly millennials.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Jeez, don't report on it. Now there's going to be an even bigger crackdown on them.

r00ty Admin , (edited )
r00ty avatar

I would say that none of the current operating systems were developed by individuals.

Linux, the original kernel was written mostly by Linus. But that was extremely basic by today's terms. There are hundreds (or more) contributors to the modern kernel. Security alone could not be a single person's job now, I'd argue.

Windows. Well, I don't think one person wrote that. 1.0 was already when MS was a business with multiple developers. The modern Windows OS has a full size kernel also like Linux and likewise one person would not be able to write something so monolithic.

macOS I don't know much about, but it's built on top of an existing *ix kernel and again one person didn't make the current version.

So individuals would struggle to make a modern secure network aware operating system.

As others have stated, there's really no reason to. The Linux kernel is free and open-source and is quite modularized. So you can take what you want from that to build your own micro to macro kernel, and then add tools you write yourself or curate afterwards. Would it truly be a new OS? Debatable, but then again, to make something secure enough for the modern era from scratch? I don't know how many people would want to even try now.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I didn't think BSD was ever made by just one person though?

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Perhaps. To be honest, I wasn't even sure how much it is related to any BSD release now. So I just went with a generic *ix to play it safe.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Amazing for one guy. But as I put in my comment elsewhere, one person writing an os that is network ready and has reasonable security is extremely unlikely now.

Templeos doesn't have memory protection even (makes sense for what it is of course).

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Just do the whole order using the NATO alphabet for clarity.

I'd like a bravo india golf, mike alpha charlie, with Lima alpha romeo golf echo, foxtrot romeo india echo sierra.

After you've been ordering for 20 minutes, they'll do something about it.. Although that might not be a good thing for you.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I thought you guys had 240v circuits precisely for this kind of load? On a decent 30a 230v circuit (they generally don't use anywhere near 30a though) here in Europe it takes considerably less than that. I'd say mine takes 5-8mins for 230c (which is around 450f) and it has a rated power of 3500w.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I had one of the older style air fryers around 12 years ago. Those were much smaller and not oven like. I think they were ideal for making small portions and especially good for re-heating food the next day.

These newer ones do seem a bit like a smaller, more efficient oven. Again, I reckon it would be useful for a lot of smaller stuff I use the main oven for, but we just don't have the space in the kitchen for one.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I guess it likely comes down to power rating, then. Also, with our old oven it used to take around 2x the time the current one does. That was just because the seal on the door was old and worn.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

If you build it, they will come.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I think in the case of forced agreements (both Roku not having a way to select disagree and disabling all hardware functionality until you agree, and blizzard not allowing login to existing games including non-live service ones) no reasonable court should be viewing this as freely accepting the new conditions.

If you buy a new game with those conditions, sure you should be able to get a full refund though, and you could argue it for ongoing live service games where you pay monthly that it's acceptable to change the conditions with some notice ahead of time. If you don't accept you can no longer use the ongoing paid for features, I expect a court would allow that. But there's no real justification for disabling hardware you already own or disabling single player games you already paid for in full.

It'll be interesting to see any test cases that come from these examples.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

You can't fool me. I've seen the IT Crowd. The internet is connected by Wifi and has a red light!

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I'm not really a fan of this kind of question. Especially if there's enough questions that time will be an issue for most. Because at first glance it's easy to think the answer might be the length of a day.

There shouldn't be a need to try to trick people into the wrong answer on an open question. Maybe with multiple choice but not an open answer question.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

I think there's likely a lot of people still on slower links that benefit for sure.

But as gigabit and better Internet becomes more mainstream, it's certainly less of a problem for those with that.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Seems quite simple to me. Things like guns, swords, daggers and the like are designed to be weapons. So they're generally going to be assumed to be a weapon any time they're used/brandished.

But literally anything can be used as a weapon. So, in normal use they're not a weapon but if used as a weapon, they become one in that instance.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

Yeah, I'd agree there. It should be whatever the US equivalent of aggravated assault is. But the charges you could levy bearing in mind he aimed for the head could go as far as attempted murder I guess.

r00ty Admin ,
r00ty avatar

The thing is, this actually if anything proves the strength of the fediverse. Lemmy.world is not Lemmy and Lemmy is not the fediverse. Just find another instance that has not blocked the community yet and carry on with your day.

Lemmy.world have every right to curate the experience for their users as they see fit and/or feel comfortable carrying the risk for.

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • random
  • lifeLocal
  • goranko
  • All magazines