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MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

This should give hope to all of those people who have been worrying about AI taking their jobs away.

It doesn’t matter how good technology gets, it will always be merely a tool. Humans will still be necessary in the future.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

It will certainly change the way we work, yes, but that’s always been the case with any disruptive technology in the past.

20-30 years ago, people were already worried that computers would replace people, because they could automate away menial office jobs like invoicing and book keeping. Yet those jobs still exist, because computers can’t be trusted to work completely autonomically. Meanwhile, a whole lot of new jobs were created in the IT sector as result of those computers needing to be programmed, updated, and maintained.

When cars came around and started replacing horse buggies, people were also worried because it would make horse breeders, stables, blacksmiths, etc. obsolete, but of course it just ended up created a new industry consisting of gas stations, car dealerships, and garages instead.

So yes, some people might lose their jobs because what they’re doing now will become obsolete, but there will almost certainly be new ones created instead. As long as you’re willing to adapt and change with the times, you’re never going to end up with nothing to do.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Sounds familiar, where I have heard this one before? 🤔

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Only makes sense if it’s text files (like source code). Even if DOCX files are just a bunch of XML files wearing ZIP trenchcoat as this guy says, chances are git doesn’t know that, so it’ll treat the whole thing as a binary file and save each revision as a separate file entirely, in which case you haven’t really accomplished much other than hiding away all those intermediate versions in an invisible drawer.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Doesn’t matter, to git they are still binary files, which means it’ll check in each revision as an entirely new copy.

Yes, you might only see the most recent one in your working directory, but under the hood, all the other ones are still there in the repo.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

what’s the problem?

It’s basically just keeping a bunch of separate files but with extra steps.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I’m sure you could, but yes, it’s likely not worth the trouble.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Everything git does is “keeping files with extra steps.”

Not quite, because text files are stored as incremental diffs, which not only saves massive amounts of space but allows for effective comparisons of what exactly has changed between versions. While the former is more of a nice bonus these days with storage being extremely cheap, the latter is in fact the main reason one would use git to begin with.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

You probably can but here’s why that’s still not gonna be all that effective.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Yes but without the ability to quickly see what’s changed between different versions (on a semantic level), all it will do for you is safe you some storage.

With a bunch of separate files, you can at least open two of them quickly and do a manual scan, but with git you can only ever have one version checked out at the same time, so now you’ll be checking out an older version, making a temporary copy of that, and then checking out the version you want to compare it to and STILL end up doing just that.

From a workflow perspective, it’s really just extra overhead, with little to no practical benefit.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Sorry, I just woke up and clearly didn’t parse your entire comment correctly. Should have had my coffee first.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I suppose it can be helpful if seeing a folder full of revisions would otherwise drive you crazy. I mean, I fully admit I also sometimes just dump a mess from my desk into a drawer just so I don’t have to look at it constantly.

Also, if you have a consistent habit of writing accurate and descriptive commit comments, you may not need to rely on being able to compare line-by-line diffs to see what’s changed between versions.

I think the moral of the story is that git is a somewhat suboptimal tool for this purpose and it whether it’s helpful at all depends far more on your habits and discipline than on the functionality it provides.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Outside of being able to comment on each revision when making a commit, I guess I don’t see what benefit this provides that regular, automated backups (such as Time Machine) don’t.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Sort by -> Date modified

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I meant the last one of those. If you have a directory of lose files, you can just open any of them and compare them directly, but if they’re all in git, you’ll either have to make a copy of your current version before checking out the other one (because it would be overwritten otherwise), or like you said, use multiple worktrees, which is a rather advanced feature (that I honestly didn’t even know existed until now).

Either way it’s a bunch of extra work and it’s only necessary because you chose the wrong tool for the job.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar
MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I find it hilarious that Linux users STILL continue to hate on Windows Update when memes like this exist.

In my experience, Linux wants to update itself far more frequently than Windows (which is really generally no more than once a month these days), and it DOESN’T EVEN OFFER THE OPTION of automatically postponing it to a more convenient time. Yes, you can always say “not now”, but then it’ll just keep bugging you again until you say yes.

Ironically, at this point, updates on Linux are basically everything that Windows used to get made fun of in the past (for good reason!), but while the situation has actually improved on Windows, on Linux it’s only become worse as distributions grow and updates become even more frequent.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

That’s certainly true, and there may even be advantages to this because security issues might get fixed more quickly, but it doesn’t change the fact that the annoyance factor is at least as high as that of Windows used to be, and there is no convenient option to have it taken care of automatically, say, at shutdown.

Instead of making fun of Windows, it would serve Linux far better to actually address this issue, even if that means copying what Microsoft did here.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I mean, popups are by definition intrusive, no?

Windows 11 just shows a little icon in the notification tray and won’t really bother you otherwise until you click on it. I think by default it will try to install the pending updates on shutdown, but when you click on the icon you can choose to either postpone it or do it immediately.

Meanwhile, Ubuntu always interrupts you with a popup which yes, you can click “Not now” on if you want to deal with it later, but then it’ll just pop up again some other time. And the only other option is to just let it do its thing (but at least it can run unobtrusively in the background and only requires a restart if there’s a kernel update).

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Technically there are, just not at any single given time, and only for as long as the consumption rate does not exceed the reproduction rate.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Haha

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Well, I just did. Here’s the response:

I’m sorry if it feels like I’m questioning your humanity! I’m just programmed to ensure a safe and productive interaction. Sometimes I ask for confirmation to ensure I’m talking to a human and not a machine or a bot. But I’m here to chat and assist you with whatever you need!

Not sure what I was expecting except the usual machine mind evasiveness.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I mean, it probably wants to make sure you’re using the API for programmatic access so they can charge you for it instead of having you abuse the free tier.

Not sure if they’re still around, but in the early days, before the API was released, there were some libraries that simply accessed the browser interface to let you programmatically create chat completions. I believe the first ChatGPT Twitter bot was implemented like that.

This post isn’t so much about whether it’s necessary from a technical standpoint (it likely is), it’s just an observation on the sheer irony and annoyance of it being that way, that’s all.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

At the current state of AI proliferation, you can literally enter you prompt into the product assistant chatbox on Amazon and get the same result you’d get from their web app.

I even remember a post a few months ago where someone did this to the chatbot on a car dealership’s website. Apparently, they currently don’t have any input filters (which would likely require yet another layer of AI to avoid making it overly restrictive), they just hook those things up straight to the main pipe and off you go.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Technically a good point, but we’re talking natural language here, and the goal would be to restrict the discussion to only a particular domain, not predict whether an outcome can be achieved or not.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

You mean captchas? Sure, that’s an old hat, they’ve been doing that for a decade now.

This is one of those newer systems though that doesn’t rely on a captcha, it’s just a checkbox you have to click that says “I’m human” next to it, and it does some JavaScript magic or whatever to figure out if it’s true. Not really sure how it works TBH.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Because you’re gonna have a hell of a shit after consuming that

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Perhaps, but I’m guessing it’s still gonna give you some mean shits

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

According to Wikipedia, it’s frozen custard if you’re in France, but in America, it’s basically a layered dessert.

Which means this thing actually DOES follow most of the rules, it’s just failing at the dessert part. Unless you’re the type of person who considers pizza a vegetable, I guess.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Don’t think I have any allergies but I am sensing a distinct lack of fiber here. Might not wreck you immediately but it the long run, it will.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Pretty much sums up how I feel about this.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Where do you think you are, Whole Foods or something?

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Hah

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I too am not an expert but I concur that this indeed appears to be a dog.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

That’s why you avoid them, and hope they’ll avoid you in return. It’s probably the least dickish thing you can do, and you can always just tell them you’ve been busy with other stuff if you do end up wanting to have contact again. Insults, offenses, betrayals, etc. are much harder to come back from.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I’m certainly not nearly as much of an Elon hater as most of this site, but even I think that thing looks like crap.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

It’s definitely unique but I still don’t want it.

MacNCheezus ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Drawn a picture of what?

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Not at all. Have at it.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Finally, a ma of culture.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Agreed. Definitely missing a bit of celery and/or pickles to make it a proper tuna salad.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I have actually tried artichoke water, albeit only from a jar, not a can. It’s not that bad if you buy a good quality product.

Would never attempt sardine juice, however.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

I don’t actually drink that stuff, I just shitpost it here for the lulz.

MacNCheezus OP ,
@MacNCheezus@lemmy.today avatar

Unite, but separately, each on your own time.

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